Strategy is doing the right things. Tactics is doing things right.

In our experience at the Centre of Excellence for Public Sector Marketing (CEPSM)  one of the biggest and costliest mistakes many public sector organizations make is to start rolling out individual marketing tactics without a strong strategic marketing strategy in place. Social media, blogging, website design, email marketing, advertising, proactive public relations, face-to-face marketing … if you don’t combine these individual tactics into a cohesive marketing strategy, you won’t get the results that you hope to obtain.marketingstrategyThe first step in realigning your marketing approach and establishing a strategic marketing plan for your public sector organization is taking the time to understand your audience.

Once you have identified the audience you’re ready to start uncovering the key issues you face – the pains and problems your audience has when purchasing your products, programs or services. If you understand what “pains” people have and offer a “remarkable solution”, it becomes a lot easier to “make the sale”. They feel connected to you and trust that you understand their specific challenges.

Most organizations think marketing and immediately think tactics. Hate to say it but most marketers think that way too!

I’ve been working for and with public sector organizations for over thirty years and I can tell you that none of the tactics matter until you are crystal clear about which direction you are going. Strategy before tactics is the simple road to success.

This does not mean that I am opposed to systematically and consistently rolling out tactics, because there is an expectation that when you work in marketing that you need to “do stuff” but you need to select only those tactics that support a marketing strategy that you can commit to.

Strategy and tactics are so intertwined; perhaps it is no wonder that people so often confuse them. Still, it is a big mistake when strategies and tactics are interchangeably used.

 “Great tactics will win you a battle, but great strategy is what wins you the war.”

Goals and objectives are the basis of any marketing initiative. But most practitioners do not know the difference between a goal and an objective. Marketing goals communicate a broad direction for your organization. Marketing objectives identify specific actions that include a measurement capability to succeed at meeting objectives.

The more specific you define the objectives, the better off you will be. This level of detail sets expectations and creates a commonality that everyone works towards. Establishing measurable objectives sets expectations, and it enables you to begin to work on a marketing strategy.

A marketing strategy offers a high-level plan to achieve your overall goals and measurable objectives.  It is a methodology and a train of thought that guides all future actions. The strategy is a platform upon which the tactics will rest or, to throw the analogy, the umbrella under which the tactics will lie.

Part of setting measurable objectives is developing key performance indicators. These indicators are yardsticks to measure progress.  Next, the marketing communications component of the strategy outlines what type of tactics to utilize and to what degree. It defines how much to invest in each tactic. The strategy further defines the markets. The strategy supports the goals and objectives, organizes the approach, and advances a plan to achieve those measures.

Strategy is as much about deciding what to do as what NOT to do.

In essence, the marketing strategy establishes the topological map. Once the topography has been defined, the tactics will create a more particular road map.  The strategy sets the campaign direction and the tactics translate those ideas into reality. For this reason, strategy does not change very often, but tactics can (and do!). The strategy represents principles that will guide the tactical execution.

In a nutshell, strategy is about picking the right goals and objectives and tactics is about how you go about achieving those goals or objectives. The role of a tactician is much simpler once you have a strategy, because the objective and the direction are already defined.

The biggest way this applies to marketing is “segmentation” and “positioning”. While marketing tactics are focused on how to interact with your potential audience, marketing strategy is more about picking the right audiences to go after. There may be many organizations out there doing what you do, and picking the right “niche” to call your own is the most important thing you can do to ensure success or guarantee failure.

Without a strategy, it’s easy for organizations to get caught up in chasing the latest marketing trends or switching tactics every week or month. Not only is that an exhausting way to do things, it also means you could be wasting time and money on tactics that will produce few results.ecommerce-marketing-strategies

What happens when you develop and implement marketing tactics without a strategy?

  • Lack of clear and consistent messaging. For marketing to be effective, you must create a consistent brand message that communicates what makes you different and why someone should buy your products, programs and services. Without a strategy in place, it makes it much harder to determine compelling messages that will speak to your audience.
  • Difficulty achieving goals and objectives. In our experience at CEPSM we find that many public sector organizations don’t have well-defined goals and objectives. But, even if you do have specific goals and objectives, it will be difficult to accomplish them without a marketing strategy. What we find in our work is that organizations often see where they want to go, but have trouble connecting the dots on how to get there. It takes research, creativity and strategic thinking to build an effective strategy. But once you do your likelihood of success is that much greater.
  • Wasted budget. If you don’t take time to build a strategy, you could be wasting time and money on the wrong tactics because you’re just guessing about what will work. Taking the time to build a marketing strategy and tactical implementation plan on the front end will ensure your budget is being spent most effectively.
  • Unfocused efforts. All your marketing tactics should flow out of a marketing strategy. It helps guide your decisions and makes it easier to determine where to spend your time and money. Without it, your efforts will be weak and unfocused. And, it’s a whole lot easier to get caught up in the marketing “tactic du jour”.

 Organizations don’t plan to fail … they fail to plan

So, how do you formulate a marketing strategy? Answer these three questions and get everyone on your team aligned around the answers. If you don’t know the answers to these questions, you’re not ready to start implementing tactics. Doing so can cause all sorts of problems:

1) Why do we do what we do?

This is the age-old mission question. Until you can get very clear about the one overarching purpose for your organization, things will always seem a bit muddy. When you can grab onto your “why” you have the basis for every decision you make and a thread that can define your branding and positioning, which leads to marketing success.

2) Who do we do it for?

The tricky part about this one is that the answer should be as narrow as possible. If you nailed the first question, your job as a marketer is to go even narrower and start really understanding who you want to reach and who gets the most value from your unique approach.

Look to your best clients. Find the commonality in this group and you should be able to develop a very narrow, ideal client profile that entails both a physical description and an ideal behaviour.

3) What do we do that’s both unique and remarkable?

The last piece of the puzzle is about what you do. But, it’s not simply about defining what products, programs and services you offer. That’s important to understand, but more important is to find and communicate how what you do is unique in a way that your ideal client finds remarkable. In a way, that allows you to stand apart from everyone else that say they do the same things as you do. i.e your unique selling proposition (USP).

This isn’t as simple as it might sound. Most organizations don’t fully understand what their audience truly values. It’s not necessarily a better product or program or good service. Those fall under the category of expectation and everyone can and usually claims them. The difference is in the details, the little things you do, the way you do it, how you treat your clients, how you make them feel. It’s in the surprises, the things that exceed their expectations.

Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat. Sun Tzu

One of the things we note in our work at CEPSM is many government programs hire communications/advertising companies to help them implement their campaigns. That makes sense if you have a marketing strategy in place. But if you don’t then you are leaving yourself wide open for wasting money and not achieving your goals and objectives.

Here’s why. Most (but not all) communications/advertising firms are tactics-focused. They are in the business of trying to convince you that their tactical approach will be successful in attracting clients or “‘increasing awareness.” That’s fine, but only if you already feel like your marketing strategy is in the right place, and just needs more fuel. However, if you experience that “sinking feeling,” that maybe you are not on the right track, then you need something more than a tactical approach. What you need is a marketing strategy which becomes your road-map for your advertising or communications supplier.

What do you do if you and your colleagues have no experience developing a marketing strategy?

The Centre of Excellence for Public Sector Marketing (CEPSM) offers public sector organizations an easy and affordable way to acquire expertise from marketing strategists to help develop a successful marketing strategy. The entire process can be completed in a very short time.

Business team discussing project with man pointing at the laptop

CEPSM’s 3-Step Marketing Consultation and Training Program

How does the 3-Step Marketing Consultation and Training Program work?

  1. Orientation

First, we familiarize ourselves with your organization, overall goals, objectives, issues, target audience (s), marketing communications activities, existing marketing research and other information that helps us understand your organization and environment.

  1. Training for Strategy Development

Once the initial orientation has been completed we will guide and facilitate your team through a two-day structured training and strategy development workshop using our exclusive CEPSM Introduction to Marketing 101 Workbook to develop an actionable integrated marketing strategy.  The strategy will include: a situation analysis, goals and objectives, a strategic market segmentation plan, branding and positioning considerations, the 4 p`s (i.e. marketing mix), key messages, and a broad range of promotional tactics and a performance measurement approach to evaluate the strategy. At the end of the two days, you will have a draft marketing strategy framework.

  1. Fine-tuning

At the end of the facilitated two-day session, CEPSM will work with your team on fine-tuning the plan with details such as specific timelines & costs as part of developing the final strategy and plan. In addition, we are available via e-mail/telephone or face-to-face meetings to discuss any questions that arise in the development of the final marketing strategy.

CEPSM also offers an coaching service which includes but is not limited to: additional training – coaching sessions to the management of a marketing program and function. This includes adhoc advice (oral or written) to support your organization in implementing the strategy plus trouble-shooting to ensure the success of the marketing strategy.

What are some other Marketing Consultation and Training Program services do we offer?

One-Day Marketing 101 for Marketers and Non-Marketers Workshop

This workshop provides participants with an overview of public sector & non-profit marketing and takes participants through an innovative session on best business practices on developing marketing strategies in a public sector environment. The workshop will also highlight the importance of market research to support a decision-making framework. The workshop combines a mix of interactive presentations, with group discussions and exercises that will enhance the participant’s skills. The resource for this workshop is CEPSM’s Introduction to Marketing 101 Workbook.

The workshop explores the strategic elements of a marketing plan and how to transform organizations from using the traditional communications approach to an integrated, strategic marketing approach. We also explore the most effective methods for acquiring and using marketing intelligence.

The workshop will give participants an overview of marketing best practices and approaches, the benefits of coordinated branding and positioning into the integrated marketing communications process, the benefits of a collaborative strategy and how to optimize shared assets.

The result of these sessions will be to establish a structured process and template for participants to develop a strategic marketing plan for their programs, products and services

What participants will learn?

  • An overview of marketing in a public-sector or non-profit environment;
  • Systematic processes and strategic elements for developing and implementing an action-oriented strategic marketing plan;
  • How to set realistic, practical marketing objectives and goals;
  • How to develop a “client-based” mindset in a public-sector and non-profit organization;
  • How to use market research to support a decision-making framework;
  • How to develop a system to measure progress, monitor performance and evaluate marketing efforts
  • How to improve the execution of marketing communications strategies

Full service consulting to develop a comprehensive marketing plan

Using a collaborative, step-by-step consulting approach, we work with our clients to develop action-oriented strategic marketing plans that can be implemented within the unique constraints of a public-sector environment.  We have worked with countless organizations, large and small, across Canada to create both customized, high-level marketing plans and comprehensive strategic marketing solutions.

For a full list of CEPSM’s Training and Consulting Programs and Services check-out our web site

For more information, contact:

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Jim Mintz, Managing Partner and Senior Consultant CEPSM.ca Office: 343-291-1137  E-mail: jimmintz@cepsm.ca

Jim Mintz is the Managing Partner of the Centre of Excellence for Public Sector Marketing (CEPSM) where he presently works with several public sector and nonprofit clients. Find out more about Jim

 

 

About jimmintz

Managing Partner, CEPSM Jim Mintz is a veteran marketing professional with many years of experience as a practioner and academic. He is presently Managing Partner at CEPSM and Program Director of the “Professional Certificate in Public Sector and Non-Profit Marketing” at Sprott School ... Specialty Areas: Social Marketing, Integrated Marketing Communications, Public Sector and Non Profit Marketing
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One Comment

  1. Peter Vukcevic 14-11-2016

    Hi Jim,

    I loved how you explained the importance of strategy if you wish to have a long-term success. It’s crucial to always have a clear picture what is the purpose and goal of your organisation in order to avoid getting sidetracked.

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