Why Charitable Foundations need to be Extra Careful with Partnerships

In 2012, I wrote a blog on breast cancer and the Susan G. Komen Foundation. The pink ribbon carries a lot of associations—women’s health, breast cancer, all types of runs, pink clothing on football players etc.

But in a prominent fight between breast cancer charity, the Susan G. Komen Foundation and women’s health organization Planned Parenthood, the ribbon was suddenly associated with controversy in an area which makes no sense except in the fanatical right-to-life world in the USA where the anti-abortion movement is very strong. What happened was the breast cancer charity decided to pull hundreds of thousands of dollars in donations to Planned Parenthood, citing a congressional investigation over whether Planned Parenthood uses federal funds for abortions. Planned Parenthood in turn accused the Komen Foundation of having “succumbed to political pressure.”

The move immediately incited backlash in the media and online, but the charity’s communications strategy and response was roundly criticized. Komen was slow to respond online — and when it did, it changed its message numerous times. First, it cited a policy stating that it doesn’t provide funding to organizations under investigation. After critics were quick to equate that to a political move aimed at appeasing right-wing donors, Komen changed tacks and said the real reason was actually related to the fact that Planned Parenthood doesn’t actually administer screenings but hands out referrals for mammograms. See my blog

Well here we go again. They are now under fire for its partnership with Baker Hughes, one of the world’s largest oilfield services, during Breast Cancer Awareness Month. According to the Huffington Post, Baker Hughes announced it would paint 1,000 of its gold drill bits pink to “serve as a reminder of the importance of supporting research, treatment, screening, and education to help find cures for this disease.” Source

baker-hughes-pink-drill-bit-300x150

San Francisco-based Breast Cancer Action “thanked Susan G. Komen and Baker Hughes for partnering on the most ludicrous piece of pink sh*t they’ve seen all year—1,000 shiny pink drill bits.” The organization said the partnership is “the most egregious example of ‘pink-washing’ they’ve ever seen,” noting that toxic fracking chemicals are linked to breast cancer.

Will this become a full-out crisis that will significantly damage their reputation and relationships with donors and supporters? Hard to say, but clearly this was a poor choice in selecting a partner. It’s not the first time the Foundation has come under fire and it most likely won’t be the last. What matters more from a reputational point of view is how true they stay to their declared set of values and priorities.

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Are you a born marketer?

I recently read a blog by BRANDMENTALIST on 6 Signs You’re A Born Marketer which I found very interesting. I always felt as a marketing practitioner and educator that people can always learn marketing but that it takes a certain type of person with certain character traits and skills to become a great marketer

 

Steve-Job-Ipad_fa_rszd

Now if you’re a marketer you may recognize some of these signs in yourself. According to the blog here are the signs that you are a BORN MARKETER

1. You’re always curious about people.

You have the natural curiosity to try to understand people’s thoughts and behaviours — why they are the way they are, why they do what they do, and what the motivations are behind their actions.

You enjoy people watching and reading about their thoughts and the psychology behind things — life stories, success stories, life-changing moments — anything that is about attitudes and motivation intrigues you.

You like to find out what makes people tick and how you can influence them. This is especially true for social marketers

As a result of this, you understand people — or at least you‘re trying to. You are open-minded and believe that everyone is different and is driven by different things.

2. You have a good eye for design.

You know how important design is to the success of a brand. You can’t stand ugly-looking websites and flyers, nor can you ever purchase a brand with a bad sense of style. Your eyes light up when you see beautiful typography. Ever since your childhood, you’ve always loved going to a cool stationery store. Your work desk is probably full of different colour pens, markers, and post-it notes.

Sometimes you feel like you waste your money on things that you don’t really need in your life as you simply buy them because they look good! But then again, possessing bad-looking products or products with bad design is an insult to who you are. You believe that what you wear and hold represents you — it doesn’t need to be expensive or luxurious — it just needs to be unique and look good — at least to your eyes.

3. You love business. But mostly how you can sell in a strategic & artful way.

You love business. (Even if you are a public sector or non-profit marketer). It’s no doubt you enjoy reading about other entrepreneurs and businessmen/women. The first section you go to when browsing a business website is the ‘Marketing’ section.

You think about people — potential customers and clients or the target market — before anything else — not just how you can squeeze the most dollars out of them but how you can make them fall in love with your brand and evangelise it, and how your brand can become a part of their lifestyle.

Unlike most people, you watch advertisements on YouTube and find them entertaining as you analyze them — how the copies touch hearts, move people, and influence actions. You search for the award-winning ads and you pass them on to friends and family – posting them on your Facebook wall as if other people are going to enjoy watching them too. Also when watching TV instead of skipping the ads with your remote control you actually watch the ads.

When you think about your competitor, instead of worrying about how they maximize their operational efficiency, you’re stressed about their marketing strategy and how you can be in front of their customers’ eyes and steal customers from them.

You don’t simply just try to sell. You do your research first (a lot of research) into the customers’ mind, attitudes, behaviours, lifestyles, desires, fears, needs and wants. Marketers are very research oriented and do not assume things they do their homework and get the facts.

You think about what you have that your competitors don’t have — what differentiates you, what is it that you offer that is uniquely valuable to your customers that your competitors don’t —  and communicate that in a creative and persuasive way. Personally, I have always felt that if you do not have a strong unique selling proposition for your service, product or program you will not be successful.

4. You can spot trends before everyone else.

As a kid, you were always the one who had the coolest toy before everybody else. You unintentionally set the trend for the people around you. But that’s because what you liked always turned out to be a market hit months later.

You have an innate ability to detect what product is going to become a market hit before it reaches the masses. And when you see a product you love in its very early stage, you think about how the product can be marketed better. You even consider marketing it and becoming a distributor in your country (but nah, that’s too much work. You’d better stick to what you do best which is ‘marketing’!). When you buy an album, you can predict what songs are going to be the second and third popular on the charts.

When you see a new technology — whether it be new software, a new app, a new website, or a new media — you can instantly see how the new technology is going to affect people’s lives — how people’s behaviours and attitudes are going to change, what the new consumer trends are going to be, and how the path to purchase and the consumer journey are going to change.

5. You are a natural influencer.

You enjoy being the connector and the influencer and you probably don’t even realize the affect you have on your friends. Your friends rely on you for information and advice on where to go and what to do. The clothes you wore two weeks ago seem to have caught the eyes of a few who are now wearing something similar if not the same.

It is mostly unintentional but it seems that you have an influence on the people around you. Maybe it is because you have a good eye for design and you can spot the trend. Maybe you just know how to pull it off and make anything you have look fun and cool. Or maybe… you are just very passionate about what you love, what you have, and what you do that people around you become intrigued when you pass on the reviews or tell them stories with such excitement— whether it be the new cafe you’ve discovered, the bar you went to over the weekend, the new album you just bought, or the book you read and how it has moved you.

You might never realize this because setting the trend is second nature to you — you don’t even realize you’re doing it!

6. You have the ability to connect the dots between different things.

You are a holistic thinker with an analytical mind. You can’t look at things in a linear way, but rather, in an interconnected way.

As a kid, you liked games that promoted holistic and strategic thinking (even though you didn’t realize what that was at the time). You probably loved Monopoly and Lego to bits. You’re also good with numbers. In fact, Math was one of your favourite subjects besides art, social studies, and psychology.

Bringing this innate ability into your career, it’s no doubt you are able to see that an effective marketing communication strategy needs to be integrated across different channels that support one another with a single-minded proposition or a cohesive message at the core.

From my experience the best marketers are people who can think strategically. This was one of the most important skills I looked for when I hired people. What I found was of 20 people I interviewed maybe 1 or 2 can think strategically. Marketing is about strategy but most people think it is about tactics.

What are your thoughts? Do you agree that marketers are born and more important do you agree with the 6 skills mentioned in this blog. Let me know what you think.

Marketing Workshops Spring 2017

Marketing 101 (for Marketers and Non-Marketers)

March 29, 2017

343 Preston Street, Ottawa, ON,

This workshop will provide participants with an overview of public sector and non-profit marketing. The workshop will teach participants how to develop a marketing  strategy and plan as well as how to transform a government/nonprofit organizations from using the traditional communications approach to an integrated, strategic marketing approach.

The workshop will focus on:

  • An overview of marketing;
  • Systematic processes and strategic elements for developing and implementing an action-oriented strategic marketing plan;
  • How to set realistic, practical marketing objectives and goals;
  • How to evaluate marketing efforts with practical ideas on how to improve execution;
  • How to develop a client-based mindset in a public sector or non-profit organization;
  • How to use market research to support a decision-making framework;
  • How to develop a system for measuring progress and monitoring performance.

REGISTER NOW

 

Intro to Social Marketing Planning for Attitude and Behaviour Change

March 9, 2017

 

343 Preston Street, Ottawa, ON,

Awareness.  Are you getting tired of hearing that word? If you want to move your marketing and communications efforts beyond merely public education and awareness campaigns and into the realm of action-oriented attitude and behaviour change then this workshop is for you

 

The workshop will focus on:

  • How to use a step-by-step structured approach to prepare a social marketing plan that is actionable, has maximum impact, and leads to successful implementation;
  • How to present and “sell” your social marketing strategy to management;
  • How to implement a social marketing program on a very tight budget;
  • How to monitor and evaluate your inputs/outputs, outcomes and impacts;
  • How social marketing gives you a single approach: for mobilizing communities; influencing the media; activating key stakeholders; and building strategic alliances with business.

REGISTER NOW

 

 

 

 

 

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Why Branding is so important to Social Marketing

Branding in a business organization is pervasive and fairly easy to understand and recognize. However, branding in social marketing is not as common but becoming more popular as it is very effective in creating visibility and ensures memorability.

“Nonprofits and government agencies are generally several steps behind the commercial sector in applying marketing concepts. Branding is a word that is thrown around a lot by marketers of all stripes without a complete understanding of what it actually means. We know we want to have a strong brand, but to some that just mean crafting a logo and tagline. A brand is much more than just the product itself or the visuals you use to promote it”. (Nedra Kline Weinreich)

The brand is the marketer’s most advanced emotional tool. It combines and reinforces the functional and emotional benefits of the offering and so adds value, encouraging consumption and loyalty. A good brand facilitates recognition, makes a promise, and, provided the full marketing back-up is in place, delivers satisfaction. Brands can provide very practical benefits. For example for young people, quick and clear brand identification can make both the buying and smoking of forbidden products such as cigarettes much less risky. Over time, brands become a fast powerful way of confirming the synergy between marketer and customer. (Social Marketing: Influencing Behaviors for Good by Philip Kotler, Nancy R. Lee)

Brands can provide very practical benefits. Over time, brands become a fast powerful way of confirming the synergy between marketer and customer.

There is also evidence that branding may be a particularly effective way to reach people in hard to reach communities. Experts in branding have concluded that the symbolic appeal of brands is particularly effective in targeting those individuals who do not have the time, skills and motivation to evaluate the objective attributes and benefits of a particular campaign. A review conducted on behalf of the UK’s National Centre for Health and Clinical Excellence also suggests that brands can be an effective way of reaching information –deprived communities. Branding with these communities seems to hold considerable promise. (Gerald Hastings in Social Marketing … Why should the devil have all the best tunes? Pg.: 100)

In social marketing, your brand is how your audience thinks about your program and connects with it emotionally. It’s the combination of how you market your programs and how the audience experiences it. It’s the feeling that by adopting certain behaviour someone becomes part of a group, and membership in that group reflects the image of who that person aspires to be.

In the case of social marketing, the product is the behaviour you are promoting — if the audience tries doing what you want them to do but has an awful experience the brand image suffers. Or the brand may be your organization, with various programs, products and services that you offer falling within that brand. So branding involves strategically crafting all the elements of your audience’s interactions with your campaign and its components so that they support the right image and evoke the right emotions.

In a social marketing context, the issue then becomes what labels and meaning to connect to desired, or perhaps even undesired, behaviours as well as to the personal or social costs and benefits that result from these behaviours. Creating brand equity for a set of positive behaviours may involve defining the desired behaviour in terms of carefully selected words or phrases and then making sure that individuals can “feel good” about doing the “right thing” by understanding and appreciating the benefits they accrue. Thus, one challenge for branding in social marketing programs is how to ensure that individuals properly value the immediate benefits of desirable behaviours.

Applying branding to social marketing programs and public health issues, however, poses several unique challenges. Social marketing, as any marketing, involves exchange. Individuals are asked to engage in certain personally and/or socially desirable behaviours. The benefits they receive in return for these actions, though, may be fairly intangible and seemingly removed, especially with respect to the more immediate benefits they might receive in exchange for engaging in undesirable behaviours.

Branding may provide an important function in social marketing programs by helping individuals to communicate and signal to themselves as well as others that they are engaging in desirable behaviours so that are better able to realize more immediate benefits and receive positive reinforcement. For example, by displaying visible symbols or by describing themselves with a categorical label that, in either case, contained specific meaning with respect to a public health issue, individuals may be able to achieve greater immediate satisfaction if they feel that they have been “credited” or acknowledged as having avoided undesirable behaviors or having embraced desirable behaviors.

Branding personally and/or socially desirable behaviors could help individuals receive more immediate rewards from the public approval and recognition of others as well as from the benefits of self-expression and personal approval and recognition. In this way, branding would play the role of making the benefits of socially desirable behaviour more immediate and more tangible to an individual on a continually repeated basis over time.

The successful development of a relationship and affinity between a brand and its target audience makes it a valuable asset that can be adapted locally or regionally, or be taken up by partner organisations.

In line with social marketing’s customer orientation criteria, brands should be based on detailed ‘insight’ into the benefits to individuals over those of competing behaviours. For a brand to succeed in building strong relationships branding should elicit a value proposition where benefits must be perceived as credible, believable and desirable to the target audience.

The degree to which the consumer feels bonded to the brand depends on how closely they feel it fits their perceived self-image. Brand images that reflect and enhance the self-image may more effectively challenge competing behaviours than functional benefits.

Brands are designed to build relationships between consumers and the products, services, or organizations they represent by providing added value to their objects. Branding is an important strategy for social marketing for example in the area of public health it can address multiple behaviours simultaneously, and most health risks stem from multiple behaviours and complex lifestyle choices. (Advances in Consumer Research Volume 25, 1998, Pages 299-302- “Branding Perspectives On Social Marketing”, Kevin Lane Keller, Duke University)

Brand equity is an important addition to social marketing campaigns. When the audience becomes familiar with a brand and forms positive associations they are more likely to engage in the desired health behavior.

Key characteristics of a brand are that it should be memorable, recognizable, distinctive, and most important to convey the products benefits and appeal. The brand identity is particularly important to visually draw attention to it and portray an appropriate image as it is often the most frequent type of contact people will have with the brand. However, branding is more than just a logo or identity it is developing brand attributes that are expressed in all of the 4 p’s i.e brand personality…the set of human characteristics associated with the brand. (Social Marketing- an international perspective – Donavan & Henley)

In some cases a campaign may have an overall brand name and various sub brands for different products. For example road safety campaigns may develop different brands for driving while impaired, speeding, distracted driving, fatigue, seat belts, baby seats etc. In a health promotion campaign , there may be an overall brand e.g. HealthyFamiliesBC but a number of specific sub brands dealing with campaigns such as healthy eating, physical activity, tobacco, healthy childhood development , promoting positive mental health , alcohol moderation, and injury prevention.

The following list includes a few well-known brands. In these cases names that have been used to identify programs and products and are applied consistently in an integrated way that is very important for social marketers.

participaction

·         “ParticipACTION”… Encouraging physical activity (Canada)

·         “VERB” … Encouraging physical activity (USA)

·         “Break Free”… Anti-smoking (Canada)

·         “Truth” … Anti-smoking (USA)

·         “McGruff the Crime Dog”… Crime prevention

·         “Operation Red Nose/Nez Rouge”… Impaired Driving (Can)

·         “Road Crew” … Drinking and driving (USA)

·         “Don’t mess with Texas”… Litter prevention (USA)

·         “Rock the vote”… Voting

·         “Back to Sleep”… Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

·         “Energy Star “… Energy conservation

·         “Smokey the Bear”… Wildfire prevention

·         “5 A Day”… Nutrition

·         “Fight” … “fight fear,” “fight distress” and “fight chaos” –    Military recruiting campaign (Canada)

·         “Be all you can be”… Military recruiting campaign (USA)

·         “Yes You Can”…International Competitiveness (Canada)

·         “Believe in Yourself”… Student Loan (Canada)

·         “Act Against AIDS”… AIDS/HIV prevention USA

·         “Break the Silence” Domestic violence

·         “SunSmart” (“Slip! Slop! Slap!”) Skin cancer prevention

·         “3 R’s Reduce Reuse Recycle” Environment

·         “Buckle-up” Seat belts safety

Picture2

To learn more about social marketing check out our Social Marketing Planning Workbook or come join us at one of our social marketing workshops.

Also if you are interested in custom workshops for your organization check out CEPSM’s In-House Consultation and Professional Development Programs

Interested in getting certified in public sector or non-profit marketing check out our  Professional Certificate in Public Sector & Non-Profit Marketing  given at the Sprott School of Business, Carleton University. Our next program will be February 8-15 2015. Register now to reserve a spot so you won’t be disappointed.

 

 

 

 

 

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Branding … an important function of social marketing for behaviour change

Branding a business organization is pervasive and fairly easy to understand and recognize. However, branding in social marketing is not as common but becoming more popular as it is very effective in creating visibility and ensures memorability.

“Nonprofits and government agencies are generally several steps behind the commercial sector in applying marketing concepts. Branding is a word that is thrown around a lot by marketers of all stripes without a complete understanding of what it actually means. We know we want to have a strong brand, but to some that just mean crafting a logo and tagline. A brand is much more than just the product itself or the visuals you use to promote it”. (Nedra Kline Weinreich)

The brand is the marketer’s most advanced emotional tool. It combines and reinforces the functional and emotional benefits of the offering and so adds value, encouraging consumption and loyalty. A good brand facilitates recognition, makes a promise, and, provided the full marketing back-up is in place, delivers satisfaction. Brands can provide very practical benefits. For example for young people, quick and clear brand identification can make both the buying and smoking of forbidden products such as cigarettes much less risky. Over time, brands become a fast powerful way of confirming the synergy between marketer and customer. (Social Marketing: Influencing Behaviors for Good by Philip Kotler, Nancy R. Lee)

Brands can provide very practical benefits. Over time, brands become a fast powerful way of confirming the synergy between marketer and customer.

 

participaction

There is also evidence that branding may be a particularly effective way to reach people in hard to reach communities. Experts in branding have concluded that the symbolic appeal of brands is particularly effective in targeting those individuals who do not have the time, skills and motivation to evaluate the objective attributes and benefits of a particular campaign. A review conducted on behalf of the UK’s National Centre for Health and Clinical Excellence also suggests that brands can be an effective way of reaching information –deprived communities. Branding with these communities seems to hold considerable promise. (Gerald Hastings in Social Marketing … Why should the devil have all the best tunes? Pg.: 100)

In social marketing, your brand is how your audience thinks about your program and connects with it emotionally. It’s the combination of how you market your programs and how the audience experiences it. It’s the feeling that by adopting certain behaviour someone becomes part of a group, and membership in that group reflects the image of who that person aspires to be.

In the case of social marketing, the product is the behaviour you are promoting — if the audience tries doing what you want them to do but has an awful experience the brand image suffers. Or the brand may be your organization, with various programs, products and services that you offer falling within that brand. So branding involves strategically crafting all the elements of your audience’s interactions with your campaign and its components so that they support the right image and evoke the right emotions.

In a social marketing context, the issue then becomes what labels and meaning to connect to desired, or perhaps even undesired, behaviours as well as to the personal or social costs and benefits that result from these behaviours. Creating brand equity for a set of positive behaviours may involve defining the desired behaviour in terms of carefully selected words or phrases and then making sure that individuals can “feel good” about doing the “right thing” by understanding and appreciating the benefits they accrue. Thus, one challenge for branding in social marketing programs is how to ensure that individuals properly value the immediate benefits of desirable behaviours.

Applying branding to social marketing programs and public health issues, however, poses several unique challenges. Social marketing, as any marketing, involves exchange. Individuals are asked to engage in certain personally and/or socially desirable behaviours. The benefits they receive in return for these actions, though, may be fairly intangible and seemingly removed, especially with respect to the more immediate benefits they might receive in exchange for engaging in undesirable behaviours.

Branding may provide an important function in social marketing programs by helping individuals to communicate and signal to themselves as well as others that they are engaging in desirable behaviours so that are better able to realize more immediate benefits and receive positive reinforcement. For example, by displaying visible symbols or by describing themselves with a categorical label that, in either case, contained specific meaning with respect to a public health issue, individuals may be able to achieve greater immediate satisfaction if they feel that they have been “credited” or acknowledged as having avoided undesirable behaviors or having embraced desirable behaviors.

Branding personally and/or socially desirable behaviors could help individuals receive more immediate rewards from the public approval and recognition of others as well as from the benefits of self-expression and personal approval and recognition. In this way, branding would play the role of making the benefits of socially desirable behaviour more immediate and more tangible to an individual on a continually repeated basis over time.

The successful development of a relationship and affinity between a brand and its target audience makes it a valuable asset that can be adapted locally or regionally, or be taken up by partner organisations.

In line with social marketing’s customer orientation criteria, brands should be based on detailed ‘insight’ into the benefits to individuals over those of competing behaviours. For a brand to succeed in building strong relationships branding should elicit a value proposition where benefits must be perceived as credible, believable and desirable to the target audience.

The degree to which the consumer feels bonded to the brand depends on how closely they feel it fits their perceived self-image. Brand images that reflect and enhance the self-image may more effectively challenge competing behaviours than functional benefits.

Brands are designed to build relationships between consumers and the products, services, or organizations they represent by providing added value to their objects. Branding is an important strategy for social marketing for example in the area of public health it can address multiple behaviours simultaneously, and most health risks stem from multiple behaviours and complex lifestyle choices. (Advances in Consumer Research Volume 25, 1998, Pages 299-302- “Branding Perspectives On Social Marketing”, Kevin Lane Keller, Duke University)

Brand equity is an important addition to social marketing campaigns. When the audience becomes familiar with a brand and forms positive associations they are more likely to engage in the desired health behavior.

Key characteristics of a brand are that it should be memorable, recognizable, distinctive, and most important to convey the products benefits and appeal. The brand identity is particularly important to visually draw attention to it and portray an appropriate image as it is often the most frequent type of contact people will have with the brand. However, branding is more than just a logo or identity it is developing brand attributes that are expressed in all of the 4 p’s i.e brand personality…the set of human characteristics associated with the brand. (Social Marketing- an international perspective – Donavan & Henley)

In some cases a campaign may have an overall brand name and various sub brands for different products. For example road safety campaigns may develop different brands for driving while impaired, speeding, distracted driving, fatigue, seat belts, baby seats etc. In a health promotion campaign , there may be an overall brand e.g. HealthyFamiliesBC but a number of specific sub brands dealing with campaigns such as healthy eating, physical activity, tobacco, healthy childhood development , promoting positive mental health , alcohol moderation, and injury prevention.

The following list includes a few well-known brands. In these cases names that have been used to identify programs and products and are applied consistently in an integrated way that is very important for social marketers.

·         “ParticipACTION”… Encouraging physical activity (Canada)

·         “VERB” … Encouraging physical activity (USA)

·         “Break Free”… Anti-smoking (Canada)

·         “Truth” … Anti-smoking (USA)

·         “McGruff the Crime Dog”… Crime prevention

·         “Operation Red Nose/Nez Rouge”… Drinking and driving   (Canada)

·         “Road Crew” … Drinking and driving (USA)

·         “Don’t mess with Texas”… Litter prevention (USA)

·         “Rock the vote”… Voting

·         “Back to Sleep”… Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

·         “Energy Star “… Energy conservation

·         “Smokey the Bear”… Wildfire prevention

·         “5 A Day”… Nutrition

·         “Fight” … “fight fear,” “fight distress” and “fight chaos” – Military recruiting campaign (Canada)

·         “Be all you can be”… Military recruiting campaign (USA)

·         “Yes You Can”…International Competitiveness (Canada)

·         “Believe in Yourself”… Student Loan (Canada)

·         “Act Against AIDS”… AIDS/HIV prevention USA

·         “Break the Silence” Domestic violence

·         “SunSmart” (“Slip! Slop! Slap!”) Skin cancer prevention

·         “3 R’s Reduce Reuse Recycle” Environment

·         “Buckle-up” Seat belts safety

 

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For those of you who want to continue learning about marketing check out the Professional Certificate in Public Sector and Non-Profit Marketing

There is a rising need for highly-skilled marketing professionals in the public and non-profit sectors to effectively bring their organization’s products, services and messages to the marketplace. The Professional Certificate in Public Sector and Non-Profit Marketing is uniquely designed to equip participants with the information, tools and solutions necessary to skillfully and mindfully navigate their way through the fascinating and complex world of marketing. This program engages participants in a rich learning environment that reinforces theory with practical, real-life examples based upon the extensive experience of the instructors.

  • Learn what you really need to know about marketing in the public and non-profit sectors in 1 week;
  • Gain the skills and expertise to assume more senior positions and responsibilities;
  • Share experiences with marketers and communicators in your sector and expand your network.

​Check out our Professional Certificate in Public Sector and Non-Profit Marketing.

Check out the latest CEPSM Workshop and Training Calendar

 

 

 

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