Marketing Workbooks for Public Sector & Non-Profit Marketers & Communicators

These two workbooks are  ideal for marketers and communicators working for government departments/agencies, non-profit/volunteer organizations, associations and social enterprises who are responsible for:

  • Marketing programs, products, programs and/or services
  • Social marketing, community outreach and public education programs

 

1. Social Marketing Planning to Change Attitudes and Behaviours Workbook

This workbook provides users with an end-to-end planning tool that lays the groundwork for a successful social marketing program to change attitudes and behaviours. This content is the result of more than 30 years of direct experience in the social marketing arena.  It will assist public sector, non-profit organizations and associations involved in marketing, communications, public awareness/education and outreach.

It will be very relevant to those responsible for influencing attitudes and behaviours to improve health, prevent injuries and diseases, protect the environment, prepare citizens for emergencies, convince youth to stay in school, and a multitude of today’s critical issues.

The workbook guides users through the process for creating a customized social marketing plan for their organization that will lead to successful implementation. It also features ideas on how to run a campaign on a very tight budget and the effective use of a logic model to monitor and evaluate an organization’s social marketing initiative.

To purchase workbook go to https://cepsm.ca/product/social_marketing_workbook/

Order Now and You’ll receive a PDF download immediately!

Alternatively, you can register on our MARCOM Conference site to attend an upcoming Introduction to Social Marketing Planning for Behaviour Change Workshop where we offer the workbook as part of 1-day interactive workshop

2. Marketing 101 for Marketers and Non-Marketers Workbook

The world of public sector and non-profit marketing is rapidly changing. Increasing demands are being placed on managers to adapt to their new environments. The public and non-profit sectors are adopting marketing approaches to help meet the challenges of complex and difficult mandates and satisfying client needs in the face of significantly diminishing resources.

This workbook provides users with an end-to-end planning tool that lays the groundwork for developing a successful public sector or non-profit marketing program.

It also will provide you with an overview of public sector and non-profit marketing and highlight the importance of market research to support a decision-making framework.

Included will be the exploration of the strategic elements of a marketing plan and how to transform organizations from using the traditional communications approach to an integrated, strategic marketing approach. We also review the key elements of  branding which is an integral component in designing the marketing mix.

To purchase workbook, go to https://cepsm.ca/product/marketing-101-for-marketers-and-non-marketers-workbook/

Order Now and you will receive a PDF download immediately!

Alternatively, you can register on our Training Page to attend an upcoming Marketing 101 Workshop where we offer the workbook as part of the course.

 

About the Author: Jim Mintz a marketing veteran with over 30 years of experience is the Managing Partner of the Centre of Excellence for Public Sector Marketing

 

 

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Marketing Trends and Tips for 2017

marketing-trend-2Every year I try to get a handle on what are the key trends for the coming year. In the past few weeks I reviewed several key online articles and bloggers to see what are the hot trends for 2017. I also checked for marketing tips that will help public sector and non-profit marketers make better marketing decisions in the coming year.

So here is a review of key marketing trends as well as some tips for 2017

Real-Time Marketing: Tips for Surviving in Our Brave New World

The Internet has changed just about everything, including how organizations market. Campaigns that take months to plan, execute, and launch is still important, but at the same time if marketers aren’t also jumping into real time… they will get lost in the shuffle.

In some ways, it’s nothing new, for decades, culture has influenced marketing, and marketing brands have influenced culture. But brands now have a brief span of time to react. If you don’t jump on something right as it happens, you’ve missed your shot.

Two trends are particularly responsible for the new world of real-time marketing: demographics and technology.

The Millennial generation is on the rise. This demographic segment is huge, and its members are the biggest consumers of media. Millennial’s are driving the real-time marketing growth because they are used to the instant gratification of digital media.

Then, we have technology itself. Smartphones provide our audiences with information, entertainment, rides and friends on demand.

Five years ago, you could report or comment on an event the next day or even the next week. You could play off cultural images for months. Now, people can watch an event unfold live on Twitter one night and move on the next morning. Marketers must keep moving, too.

Marketers should develop quick responses to mainstream life, and they’ve got to do it fast. The benefits of real-time marketing are becoming very important.

Today, people expect authenticity from the organizations that they deal with. They want to identify with the organizations that value the same things they do. And it’s just as important that you, the marketer, know which opportunities to pass up and how to jump on the right ones.

Here are a few things that can help marketers.

  1. Don’t unplug from social

Organizations that do real-time marketing well are always plugged in to the social space. Pay attention to the buzz going on every day, not just around big events. Those cultural moments might provide the perfect opportunity, but staying plugged in is the only way to be truly prepared to seize them.

  1. Cut through the clutter

Let’s face it, there’s a lot of noise out there. Be dynamic and personalized. Answer the question “What’s in it for me?” for your audience and keep the message adaptable to the platform.

  1. You can’t afford to sit still

Keeping up isn’t sufficient. You must be ahead. Read constantly, educate yourself on the content your targets care about, and put yourself in their shoes: What are they going to be most excited about, and how can you engage them on the next big trend?

  1. In a conversation, you must give and receive

Once you put something out there, be ready to engage in two-way conversations. This isn’t a world of broadcast messages anymore, and marketing isn’t just push; it’s a push-pull system. Be willing to say, “We put it out there, and now we’re in a conversation. We have to engage.”            

6 Tips to Develop a 2017 Marketing Plan that Rocks

Having a successful marketing plan in tact as you enter 2017 will ensure you are allocating your resources effectively, promoting and growing your business, and differentiating your organization from its competitors. Consider these 6 tips based on the top marketing trends of 2017 as you continue to develop your plan:

  1. Increase your social media advertising budget.

Major changes are happening for organizations in the world of social media, particularly Facebook. Over the past year, the platform has seen a decrease in organic reach to lead companies into paid advertising.

Paid advertising on social media is hardly ground-breaking. In fact, it’s possible you’ve been doing it for years. What is ground breaking is the sharp increase in marketing budgets allocated to social media advertising experts expect to see in 2017.

  1. Don’t assume “mobile” means a smartphone.

Smartphones are not likely to become obsolete anytime soon, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t a new mobile device taking the world by storm. The number of people sporting wearable mobile devices (think smartwatches) is projected to increase in the USA by 60% this year. What does this mean for marketers in 2017? It means you’ve got a brand-new playing field to market to. You need to be prepared to produce content to fit the format for this new breed of potential customers.

  1. Produce more niche content.

We’re in the midst of a content arms race. More content is published daily than ever before (over 2 million blog posts per day), which makes it nearly impossible for small organizations to compete when it comes to broad content topics. There is just too much of it.

But before you decide your content is doomed to never reach human eyes, think again; along with this spike in production, there is a drop in the quality of content that is mass-produced. people have learned to alter their search to identify a narrower, more targeted range of content, therefore weeding out material that is vague and unfocused. If you can rise to the challenge by answering more specific questions, doing the research to identify what information your viewers truly need, and providing it, you stand a chance in this arms race.

  1. Make more videos.

Who wants to look at boring text when they can watch a video instead? Not your audience, that’s who! As we approach 2017, 4 times as many customers would rather watch a video about a product or service than read about it, 1 in 4 consumers lose interest in an organization if it doesn’t have videos, and audiences are nearly 50% more likely to read email newsletters that include links to a video.

As you develop a marketing plan for 2017, be thoughtful regarding which content could be better delivered through a video. Helpful tip: if you’re looking to break into Snapchat in 2017, snapping clips of videos your company produces is a great place to start and will direct viewers to your more serious content.

  1. Increase your email marketing budget.

Let’s put these rumors to rest right now… email marketing is not dead. Far from it. That being said, there are some changes you can make to your email marketing plan in 2017. First things first, using a first name does not mean an email is personalized. Use tools like Hubspot to include links to relevant content and offers that will interest your audience.

Second, do not, include more than one call to action in an email. Many people receive up to hundreds of emails in a day, so you can bet they are skimming most of them. Your email should be as short as possible, concise, and have only one clear purpose. Otherwise, you run the risk of being perceived as just another annoying, spammy, overwhelming marketing email.

And finally, eliminate spammy subject lines. You have one chance to make a first impression, and consumers eyes are drawn to certain words that indicate spam. Check out this list of words to avoid to ensure your email actually get opened.
As I pointed out in one of my blogs recently, developing a thorough marketing plan is essential to your success in 2017. The more strategic you are, the further your core message will reach. Think of your marketing plan as a map that will lead you to your goals, and be sure to make these changes to ensure you are keeping up with the times.

The Future of Influencer Marketing: Top Predictions for 2017

As I mentioned in one of my blogs a few months ago, 2017 is the year when Influencer Marketing will become embedded into Marketing & Communication activities. Organizations need to be more agile and align their messages and content with what the influencer community really cares about. They need to invest in training internal subject matter experts to connect with the influencer community both offline and online to win over the key influencers. Authenticity and credibility as well as engaging content will be pivotal to successful engagement to improve brand perception and trust with your audiences.

8 Experts Predict The Digital Marketing Trends For 2017

Video will be a phenomenal growth channel for 2017 

An amazing year comes to an end, with mobile numbers sky-rocketing, viral videos breaking the internet, organic reach nose-diving and content marketing becoming mainstream. If this year saw the rise of online video, 2017 will see the explosion of video content on tiny mobile screens   With 4G expected to become the norm, we’ll be getting a lot more videos in our news-feeds. More than 50% of mobile data is already dominated by videos and this trend will see a sharp rise next year. Facebook is planning to add a dedicated video tab in their apps in a major redesign, aiming to become the home of videos on the internet. That’s just Facebook, YouTube is paddling hard to stay relevant, new platforms like Snapchat are right at the border and LinkedIn has jumped in the race with native video for B2B.

Behaviour-based e-mail marketing

Digital marketing in 2017 will be all about segmented & behaviour based email marketing. As consumers subscribe to more brands online, the volume of emails hitting their inboxes has only gone up in the past one year. This has resulted in higher unsubscribe rates and lower open rates. Consumers will not pay attention to your email if it is not useful for them. The best way to combat this would be to segment your email list based on consumers’ behaviour and send customized emails that are targeted to specific sets of customers.

When consumers notice that all the email communication they receive from a brand is relevant and useful for them, they will pay attention, stay subscribed and act on the emails.

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17 Marketing Trends to Watch Out For In 2017

  1. Interactive Content

There’s content you can read, and then there’s content you can interact with. The second variety tends to be more popular. Think of ways to get readers to actively participate instead of passively consume. Interactive content can include assessments, polls, surveys, infographics, brackets and contests.

  1. Influencer Marketing

What’s more effective than an ad in selling your product? A lovable social media personality speaking highly about your product to his or her fans and followers. Influencer marketing is on the rise, because people tend to trust recommendations from people they see as thought leaders. The right influencers establish credibility through each social media post or advertisement. When they work with organizations, it’s because they genuinely believe in them, and that trust is passed on to marketers’ audiences.

  1. Mobile Video

Have you looked at your Facebook feed recently? Chances are that 95% of it is video. And here’s a fun stat: mobile video views grew six times faster than desktop views in 2015. In fact, in Q4 of 2015, mobile video views exceeded desktop views for the first time ever. We now live in an age of mobile video, and it’s time we embraced it.

  1. Livestreaming

Although we’re still working out the kinks of this technology, it’s clear that livestreaming will continue to push the boundaries. A big step in this direction was Instagram’s integration of a livestream option into its Stories feature. We’re going to see a lot more live broadcasts in 2017.

  1. Chatbots

Chatbot technology has become much more sophisticated. A great example is Facebook, which invests a significant amount of resources into bot programs that provide users with news updates, personalized responses and more. Are you talking to a human or a bot? If you can’t tell, then the bot is working as intended.

  1. Virtual and augmented reality

One of 2016’s biggest highlights were watching a screen-afflicted population carry their mobile devices out into the world to catch, yes, Pokémon. The biggest takeaway from this phenomenon was augmented reality’s ability to drive real business results. This has become a seriously viable option for marketers looking to bring the online into the real world.

  1. Short-lived content

What gives Snapchat its appeal? The fact that the content disappears. Snapchat’s rampant rise in popularity did a lot more for the world of social media than just give users another platform to choose from. It showed the value of disappearing or short-lived content. This is a key attraction for Generation Z, the cohort famous for having an eight-second attention span, and is why you should be integrating short-lived content into your content strategy.

  1. Mobile First Strategy

The future is mobile. Internet traffic is now coming more from mobile devices than desktops. If you’re not catering your content, ads and online experience to a mobile user, then you are missing a massive opportunity. And remember: It’s not just about “optimizing” for mobile; it’s also about making sure that piece of content gets integrated with a user’s lifestyle on the go.

  1. Personalization

Personalization means segmenting your content to reach different types of audience members based on their preferences, habits, etc. The most common form of this strategy is through lists, where certain content gets sent to certain types of users based on which lists they’ve opted into. In a world of too much content and not enough time, personalization is a huge win for organizations looking to earn the attention of their consumers.

  1. Native Advertising

Viewers, followers and consumers are getting wise to the tricks of advertisers, and it’s becoming harder and harder to maintain their attention and earn their trust. Native advertising means integrating your advertising efforts into content that already provides value to readers and viewers. For this reason, it tends to be more effective. Look for ways to weave your products and offerings into a larger narrative, instead of just blasting people with ads.

  1. Marketing Automation

Why do the same thing repeatedly when you can do it once and automate the rest? Automation is becoming extremely powerful (and popular) among marketers and businesses who are looking to scale and expand past trading hours. As apps, such as Marketo and Hubspot become more intuitive and affordable, automation will become more common.

  1. Purpose Driven Marketing

One of the most effective ways to extend your story is to give it a feel-good element. Businesses that partner with nonprofits or charities, or set up internal programs that “give back” in some way have a much stronger presence because their story resonates with the hearts of consumers. (This will be an excellent opportunity for nonprofits to develop partnerships with the private sector in 2017)

  1. Data Driven Marketing

There are two types of marketers: those who want to use what’s popular and those who use what works, regardless of whether it’s popular or not. Data tells you what’s really moving the needle, and the truth is that every marketer needs to be conscious of it. If you aren’t fluent in Facebook ads and conversion ratios, for example, then you’re missing a crucial part of every marketer’s essential toolbox.

  1. Social Media “Buy” Buttons

We are moving into an age where purchasing doesn’t need to happen on a third-party site. Users are on a social platform, so why should they have to leave to buy something?  “Buy” buttons are quickly turning social media sites such as Facebook and Pinterest into social shopping experiences.

  1. Dark Social

The hardest part about tracking traffic, conversions and shares is that you’re not always sure what the sources are. With the rise of encrypted and private messaging apps (where people still share lots of content with each other), you may want to invest in tools, such as Google Analytics that can measure, to some degree, where this “dark” traffic is coming from.

  1. Embrace The lOT (Internet of Things)

Should your thermostat talk to you? How about a refrigerator that informs you when you’re low on milk, and then gives you the option to place an order immediately? Everyday objects are beginning to connect to the internet, and this trend is going to open doors for marketers to integrate with the everyday lives of consumers. Watch this trend closely, because it’s going to boom!

  1. Beyond Viewability

Currently, most organizations use viewability to measure to their success. Instead of solely focusing on views or clicks, marketers should measure their ROI on things such as sign-ups, downloads and purchases. This requires going beyond CPMs and looking at the performance-based metrics instead.

New addition to Blog May 22 2017

Check out this article

What Is the Internet of Things?

The Internet of Things is a truly amazing development that is likely going to change our lives for the better: it’s already bringing about massive positive changes in industry, healthcare, logistics and our own homes. However, as with all such developments, there is a darker side that we need to deal with as well.

 

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MARKETING WORKBOOKS FOR PUBLIC SECTOR & NON-PROFIT MARKETERS & COMMUNICATORS

Two workbooks ideal for marketers and communicators working for government departments/agencies, non-profit/volunteer organizations, associations and social enterprises who are responsible for:

  • Marketing programs, products, programs and/or services
  • Social marketing, community outreach and public education programs

Social Marketing Planning to Change Attitudes and Behaviours Workbook

This workbook provides users with an end-to-end planning tool that lays the groundwork for a successful social marketing program to change attitudes and behaviours. The content is the result of more than 30 years of direct experience in the social marketing arena.  It will assist public sector, non-profit organizations and associations involved in marketing, communications, public awareness/education and outreach.

To purchase workbook, go to https://cepsm.ca/product/social_marketing_workbook/

Order Now and You’ll receive a PDF download immediately!

Alternatively, you can register on our MARCOM Conference site to attend an upcoming Introduction to Social Marketing Planning for Behaviour Change Workshop where we offer the workbook as part of 1-day interactive workshop

 

Marketing 101 for Marketers and Non-Marketers Workbook

This workbook provides users with an end-to-end planning tool that lays the groundwork for developing a successful public sector or non-profit marketing program.

It also will provide you with an overview of public sector and non-profit marketing and highlight the importance of market research to support a decision-making framework.

To purchase workbook, go to https://cepsm.ca/product/marketing-101-for-marketers-and-non-marketers-workbook/

Order Now and you will receive a PDF download immediately!

 

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State of Public Sector and Non-Profit Marketing

Organizations in the public and non-profit sectors have long debated the applicability of marketing concepts and management approaches, many of which stem from private sector notions of consumption and economic choice, as well as an environment in which market forces rule. In recent years, however, there has been growing recognition that marketing can be used to enrich public sector and non-profit management and to better serve citizens and stakeholders.

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Some government organizations are turning to the following specific applications of marketing to better meet their objectives:

  • Marketing of products and services. Many public sector organizations offer products and services for a fee (either on a cost-recovery or for-profit basis to support core public good programs). In this context, marketing is not dissimilar to marketing of products and services that occur in the private sector.
  • Social marketing. This entails campaigns to change attitudes and behaviour of a target audience or audiences (e.g. anti-smoking, energy conservation, emergency planning, healthy living, etc.)
  • Policy/Program marketing. This type of marketing includes campaigns to convince specific sectors of society to accept policies, or new legislation (e.g. anti-tobacco legislation, gun control , funding for the arts,etc.).
  • Demarketing or “don’t use our programs” marketing. This would include campaigns to advise and/or persuade targeted groups not to use government programs/facilities/services (e.g. use of hospital emergency rooms, use of 911 for non- emergencies, etc.).

A major role has also emerged for marketing in the non-profit sector, where it is now used to encourage donors, recruit volunteers, get clients to buy or use products/programs and services, advocate policies to key stakeholders, execute behavior change campaigns, enhance the image and branding of their organization, attract new members, forge partnerships and strategic alliances, and define the very programs and services offered by organizations.

The practice of sound marketing management in these two sectors clearly offers important benefits in terms of responding to the heightened expectations of citizens and stakeholders, engaging target audiences in the development of programs and services that affect them, shifting the focus of campaigns from awareness to behaviour change, better targeting resources, and improving program/service outcomes.

Recognizing the growing importance of marketing in the public and non-profit sectors, The Centre of Excellence for Public Sector Marketing (CEPSM) was launched in 2005, to help public sector and nonprofit organizations overcome the unique challenges they face in their marketing and communications initiatives. CEPSM’s mission is “to advance the marketing discipline in the public and nonprofit sectors”.

The core competencies of CEPSM include:

  • Product, Program & Service Marketing
  • Digital Marketing & Social Media Engagement
  • Sponsorship & Partnership Development
  • Revenue Generation
  • Social Marketing (Attitude & Behaviour Change)
  • Branding Management & Strategy
  • Integrated Marketing Communications
  • Strategic Communications
  • Service Excellence

After 11 years of working with hundreds of organizations in both the nonprofit and public sectors in Canada (and a few international clients), here is my take on the state of public sector and nonprofit marketing.

Generally speaking strategic marketing management, with a few exceptions, is not broadly recognized or practised in the government, nor in the non-profit sectors. In addition, many of the best practices in marketing have not been adopted by government and non-profit organizations.

The government sector, in particular, lacks the culture and organizational support to advance the practice of marketing. Government organizations lack a common understanding of strategic marketing principles, from the senior executive level down. This is evidenced in both the culture and the behaviour.  Specifically, they…

  • are more focused on tactics and implementation than on strategic marketing and planning;
  • do not have a proactive, systematic approach to identifying high value, client-centered ideas and turning these ideas into new products, programs and services;
  • do not tend to measure to improve results and ensure accountability of marketing expenditures;
  • do not support the marketing function both in terms of funding and culture; and
  • have difficulty attracting, training and retaining staff with marketing skills given the culture and lack of organizational support.

Here are some top observations on the State of Marketing in the nonprofit and public sectors:

  1. Marketing function tends to be housed in the Communication function and being run by people with very little background or experience in marketing.
  2. Very few organizations develop a comprehensive marketing strategy. We noted a few cases where organizations do have a separate marketing department with  marketing staff and no evidence of an overall marketing strategy.
  3. Lack of a structured process for identifying, planning and implementing programs, services or campaigns.
  4. Lack of attention to segmentation. Hard to believe that in 2016 we still hear the words “general public”.
  5. Lack of marketing research and failure to develop monitoring and evaluation strategies.
  6. Lack of attention to branding and positioning.
  7. Lack of attention to conducting competitive analysis, especially in organizations where they have major competitors.
  8. Do not take all the 4 p’s into consideration. Mostly focus on communications or promotion.
  9. Too bureaucratic and lack flexibility.
  10. Confusion between marketing and communications, and marketing roles & responsibilities unclear.
  11. Public sector & non-profit organizations with revenue generation mandates lack business and marketing/business expertise and culture.
  12. Lack of staff incentives for achieving marketing objectives.
  13. Tendency to be more reactive than proactive.

Not a pretty picture. I wish I could give better news but introducing a marketing function and culture into a government operation or a non-profit is a major challenge because of the nature of the beast. Marketing requires some risk-taking, moving quickly as opportunities arise, changing direction and most important a focus on clients rather than the organization.

This is not to say that there are not some pockets of great marketing in government and non-profit sectors but they are rare. I’ve blogged about successful marketing efforts in the past and I’ll continue to do so as I see them.

Implications

So where do we go from here?

As a starting point, there is a need to educate senior managers in government and non-profit organizations about the value and applicability of strategic marketing management principles. First, this requires recognition across all levels of government of the value of strategic marketing management both in terms of the potential impact on the effectiveness and efficiency of programs, services and outreach campaigns, as well as the benefit to citizens.

Within government organizations, there is wide recognition of the role and value of the communications function. There is an opportunity to broaden this function to include a broader strategic marketing mandate and to re-position it as a new, expanded role for the communications community. However, it is important that the function is led and staffed with people who have a marketing background.

As we move into the digital age, government and non-profit organizations need to examine the process by which they develop and manage client-centred products, programs and services. Marketing management systems and practices must be adopted from the planning level across. Furthermore, measurement systems must be put in place to track success against marketing objectives and make necessary adjustments to improve performance.

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The Centre of Excellence for Public Sector Marketing (CEPSM) offers public sector organizations an easy and affordable way to acquire expertise from marketing strategists to help develop a successful marketing strategy. The entire process can be completed in a very short time.

CEPSM’s 3-Step Marketing Consultation and Training Program
How does the 3-Step Marketing Consultation and Training Program work?

1. Orientation
First, we familiarize ourselves with your organization, overall goals, objectives, issues, target audience (s), marketing communications activities, existing marketing research and other information that helps us understand your organization and environment.

2.Training for Strategy Development
Once the initial orientation has been completed we will guide and facilitate your team through a two-day structured training and strategy development workshop using our exclusive CEPSM’s Marketing 101 for Marketers and Non-Marketers to develop an actionable integrated marketing strategy. The strategy will include: a situation analysis, goals and objectives, a strategic market segmentation plan, branding and positioning considerations, the 4 p`s (i.e. marketing mix), key messages, and a broad range of promotional tactics and a performance measurement approach to evaluate the strategy. At the end of the two days, you will have a draft marketing strategy framework.

3. Fine-tuning
At the end of the facilitated two-day session, CEPSM will work with your team on fine-tuning the plan with details such as specific timelines & costs as part of developing the final strategy and plan. In addition, we are available via e-mail/telephone or face-to-face meetings to discuss any questions that arise in the development of the final marketing strategy.
CEPSM also offers a coaching service which includes but is not limited to: additional training – coaching sessions to the management of a marketing program and function. This includes adhoc advice (oral or written) to support your organization in implementing the strategy plus trouble-shooting to ensure the success of the marketing strategy.

What are some other Marketing Consultation and Training Program services do we offer?

One-Day Marketing 101 for Marketers and Non-Marketers Workshop
This workshop provides participants with an overview of public sector & non-profit marketing and takes participants through an innovative session on best business practices on developing marketing strategies in a public sector environment. The workshop will also highlight the importance of market research to support a decision-making framework. The workshop combines a mix of interactive presentations, with group discussions and exercises that will enhance the participant’s skills. The resource for this workshop is CEPSM’s Marketing 101 for Marketers and Non-Marketers Workbook.

The workshop explores the strategic elements of a marketing plan and how to transform organizations from using the traditional communications approach to an integrated, strategic marketing approach. We also explore the most effective methods for acquiring and using marketing intelligence.

The workshop will give participants an overview of marketing best practices and approaches, the benefits of coordinated branding and positioning into the integrated marketing communications process, the benefits of a collaborative strategy and how to optimise shared assets.
The result of these sessions will be to establish a structured process and template for participants to develop a strategic marketing plan for their programs, products and services

  • What participants will learn?
  • An overview of marketing in a public-sector or non-profit environment;
  • Systematic processes and strategic elements for developing and action-oriented strategic marketing plan;
  • How to set realistic, practical marketing objectives and goals;
  • How to develop a “client-based” mindset in a public-sector and non-profit organization;
  • How to use market research to support a decision-making framework;
  • How to develop a system to measure progress, monitor performance and evaluate marketing efforts
  • How to improve the execution of marketing communications strategies

Full service consulting to develop a comprehensive marketing plan

Using a collaborative, step-by-step consulting approach, we work with our clients to develop action-oriented strategic marketing plans that can be implemented within the unique constraints of a public-sector environment. We have worked with countless organizations, large and small, across Canada to create both customized, high-level marketing plans and comprehensive strategic marketing solutions.

For a full list of CEPSM’s Training and Consulting Programs and Services check-out our web site https://cepsm.ca/

For more information, contact:
Jim Mintz, Managing Partner and Senior Consultant CEPSM.ca
Office: 343-291-1137 E-mail: jimmintz@cepsm.ca

Jim Mintz is a Managing Partner of the Centre of Excellence for Public Sector Marketing (CEPSM) where he presently works with several public sector and nonprofit clients.

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Difference between Canadians and Americans

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For many years, I taught marketing courses at both the University of Ottawa and Carleton University. I encouraged my students, particularly foreign students to better understand the not so subtle differences between Canada and the USA and to be able to use those insights in their marketing efforts.

Since that time, I have had the opportunity to work with clients in the public sector and non-profit field trying to make inroads into the USA. So, for those marketers who are marketing to USA and vice versa this is for you.

One of the books I used in my class when I was teaching marketing was Fire and Ice: The United States, Canada and the Myth of Converging Values by Michael Adams. The book was written in 2003 but is still somewhat relevant today although there have been many changes in both countries in the past 13 years.

Michael Adams offered a surprising argument that the values of Canadians and Americans were diverging in important ways. Despite the two countries’ profound economic integration, (and the fact that 90% of Canada’s residents live within 100 miles of the US border) their many historical, demographic, and geographic similarities, and the ubiquity of American popular culture in Canada, Adams argued that Canadians and Americans increasingly view the world differently.
Relying on thousands of social values surveys conducted in Canada and in the United States, Adams describes cross-border differences on matters ranging from religion, authority, and the family to entertainment, consumption, and civic life. Fire and Ice offered an illuminating portrait of the evolving values of two nations separated at birth.

Adams was particularly interested in finding out why an initially “conservative” society like Canada has ended up producing an autonomous, inner-directed, flexible, tolerant, socially liberal, and spiritually eclectic people while an intentionally “liberal” society like the United States has ended up producing a people who are, relatively speaking, materialistic, outer-directed, somewhat intolerant, socially conservative, and deferential to traditional institutional authority.

He asked “why do these two societies seem to prove the law of unintended consequences?” Americans may speak the same language as Canadians ( although Canada was founded on 2 official languages English and French), and both watch much the same TV, the same movies, and read many of the same books – there are Canadians appearing in those TV programs and in those movies, and even ghost-writing for the President (e.g. Conservative writer David Frum, son of one the best-known broadcasters in Canada- the late Barbara Frum) — but make no mistake, Americans are not the same as Canadians.

If Adams were writing the book today he would be somewhat astonished by the recent American election, Canadians are somewhat puzzled and shocked that the USA could elect someone like Donald Trump.

Now Canada and the world awaits the 45th President of the United States with curiosity and incredulity. He and his associates have reiterated plans to re-write or cancel trade agreements, deport illegal undocumented aliens, withdraw from international agreements on climate change and nuclear arms, rethink NATO and recast relations with Russia. (My Mom who was a Russian immigrant to Canada once told me that the Russians are a great people but you cannot trust their politicians).

So, what is the difference between the 2 countries today? According to Canadian, Andrew Cohen, a journalist and author, and a Fulbright Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C. Canada does not produce out spoken billionaires (yes there is Conrad Black but he is no longer a Canadian). Ours, like the Thomsons, McCains and Irvings, live modest lives. They don’t go into politics and they don’t trade in innuendo and conspiracy. Our prime ministers tend to be humble and deferential.

Trump represents a sense of the world utterly different from Canada.
He wants to close the US borders to Muslims, build a wall (or is it now a fence?) facing Mexico, refuse all Syrian refugees. Canada has taken 33,000 Syrians and may bring in more. Canada embraces open immigration, and are considering admitting more than 300,000 newcomers a year (its population is a tenth of the size of the US). Canada is the only Western democracy without an anti-immigration party.

Trump wants to repeal – perhaps amend – Obamacare. Canada have had a universal single payer healthcare system for 50 years. Canadians believe in government, with some role in the economy, and defender of national culture. Trump sees government harshly. He picks up from Ronald Regan who stated that “government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem.”

Trump opposes free trade. Canadians depend on it, which is why Canada has NAFTA, negotiated the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement with the European Union, and endorsed the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Trump slags the United Nations and criticizes NATO. Multilateralism is the foundation of Canadian internationalism, long a counterweight to the influence of the United States.

Trump opposes climate change. Canadians, in general, are keen to act on climate change starting with a carbon tax. Trump is against abortion and for the death penalty. Canadians allow abortion and abolished capital punishment in 1976. Trump tends to degrade women. Canada has a cabinet of gender equity. Trump is protectionist, nativist and isolationist, an America Firster. Canadians are open to free trade, immigration, peacekeeping and an integrated world. Canada’s youthful prime minister has sunny ways; Trump has Sunni ways.

Recently, the Gallup organization in the US updated a series of questions they have asked over the years about what behaviours or choices Americans consider to be moral or immoral. Bruce Anderson & David Coletto of Abacus Research decided to mirror the questions in their July 2016 survey of Canadians.

Here’s what they found:

• The vast majority in Canada (95%) and the US (89%) consider birth control morally acceptable. But Canadians are 22 points more likely to say it is moral to have a baby out of wedlock, (84%-62%). And 26 points more likely to say abortion is morally acceptable (69%-43%).

• Canadians are 21 points more likely to say gay or lesbian relations are moral (81% vs 60%), 19 points more likely to say that sex between unmarried people is moral (86% vs 67%) and 14 points more likely to say divorce is moral (86%-72%).

• Canadians are far more likely to feel that doctor assisted dying is morally acceptable (79%-53%).

• Canadians are 15 points more likely to think pornography is morally acceptable than Americans (49% in Canada, 34% in the US).

• Americans are more comfortable with the idea of medical testing on animals and wearing clothing made of animal fur, by 14 points.

•Very few in either country believe it would be moral to clone a human (14% in Canada, 13% in the US).

• Interestingly, there is almost no difference when it comes to the death penalty, with majorities in both countries (58% in Canada, 59% in the US) considering it morally right.

Americans are also more open to the idea of cloning animals, but most people in both countries feel this is immoral.

Yes, Canadians love Hockey which is its national sport, Many Canadians also like football, basketball and baseball. My Americans friends are absolutely floored when I tell them that both American Football and Basketball were invented by Canadians. And recently it was discovered that Baseball was a British invention. Soccer is starting to become popular in both countries especially with the influx of immigrants who come from countries where soccer (known as football) is very popular.
Oh, one more thing, Canadians are totally baffled with regards to the American love affair with guns. It seems that almost every week there is some type of mass killing.

But the biggie is the NRA, how does a country allow itself to be controlled by an association of gun owners. Extraordinary!

Here are some quotes regarding Canada and the USA:

A Canadian is someone who knows how to make love in a canoe without tipping it. – Pierre Berton

Canada is the essence of not being. Not English, not American, it is the mathematic of not being. And a subtle flavour – we’re more like celery as a flavour – Mike Meyers

For some reason a glaze passes over people’s faces when you say “Canada”. Maybe we should invade South Dakota or something. – Sandra Gotlieb, wife of Canadian ambassador to US

Americans arrive at the Canadian border with skis in July- Canadian Border Guard

I’ve been to Canada, and I’ve always gotten the impression that I could take the country over in about two days. – Jon Stewart

When I was crossing the border into Canada, they asked if I had any firearms with me. I said, “Well, what do you need?” – Steven Wright

I saw a notice that said “Drink Canada Dry” and I’ve just started – Brendan Behan

Americans like to make money: Canadians like to audit it. I know no country where accountants have a higher social and moral status. – Northrop Frye

The state has no business in the bedrooms of the nation – Pierre Trudeau former Prime Minister of Canada

We’ll explain the appeal of curling to you if you explain the appeal of the National Rifle Association to us. – Andy Barrie

Canada could have enjoyed: English government, French culture, and American know-how. Instead it ended up with: English know-how, French government, and American culture. – John Robert Colombo

A Canadian is merely an unarmed American with health care. – John Wing

I believe the world needs more Canada – Bono

Canadians are more polite when they are being rude than Americans are when they are being friendly. – Edgar Friedenberg

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