Category Archives: Public Sector & Government Marketing

Federal Government Advertising Losing Credibility

Last year I wrote a blog “Has federal government communications and marketing become too politicized?”  In the blog I pointed out that the application of strategic communications has shifted focus from substance to image, from information to promotion, and from policy to communications. While it is legitimate for governments to communicate with citizens and it is not unusual for them to want to persuade those citizens, the question becomes when and where to draw the line.

Now an independent public [...]

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Branding… the most important component of a Marketing or Communications Strategy

As markets become more competitive, and clients become more demanding, organizations must work harder to secure their fundamental relationships. Building distinctive relationships with their clients and stakeholders is what branding is about, whatever the market, whoever the client. The brand is the marketer’s most advanced emotional tool. It combines and reinforces the functional and emotional benefits of the offering, adding value, encouraging consumption and loyalty.  A good brand facilitates recognition, makes a promise, and, provided the full marketing and communications [...]

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Reflections on MARCOM 2014

Another great year for MARCOM 2014… “Canada’s premiere educational forum for public and not-for-profit sector marketers and communicators”. Great speakers and trade show; great venue at the Ottawa Convention Centre and this year’s food was the best ever. No question that my colleague Claire Mills and the advisory committee, volunteers and sponsors did a great job in organizing and running the event.

The forum Keynote, Mitch Joel, President of Twist Image, was terrific as usual. This year he discussed five [...]

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Does Inaccurate Political Polling Have Implications for Marketers and Communicators?

Many public sector marketers and communicators are very reliant on POR (public opinion research). Many marketing and communication decisions are based on this type of research. But what happens when POR become unreliable? What alternatives do marketers and communicators have to POR? Have we become too addicted to POR?

Now we recently witnessed polling inaccuracies in elections in BC. Alberta, and most recently in Ontario, also we have seen some significant inaccurate polls in the USA.

IAN McGUGAN points out in [...]

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